Research event

Toward a European grand strategy

A presentation by Marina E. Henke (Northwestern University, Chicago). This event is part of the CISP colloquium.

How do Europe’s grand strategic options look like? What European actions are required to ensure the survival of the transatlantic security partnership for decades to come? Conversely, what political and military strategy could Europe adopt to provide for its own security? In this presentation, four grand strategic postures which Europe could adopt independently or in response to U.S. policy will be developed. These postures include but are not limited to transatlantic cooperation. They also look at possible European responses to an increasingly assertive Russia and tensions in the Asia Pacific; they assess what nuclear force postures Europe could adopt; what military resources it ought to develop, the budget requirements Europe needs to meet to finance these military capabilities, and what institutional umbrella would best address each strategic effort. Her presentation also examines the likelihood of implementation of each one of these postures using arguments that derive from the three main perspectives in contemporary IR theory: liberalism, realism and constructivism.

This presentation by Marina Henke seeks to stimulate policy discussion and debate on how transatlantic relations can best be managed going forward. It is part of the CISP Colloquium.

Marina E. Henke is Assistant Professor of International Relations at Northwestern University in Chicago. Her academic expertise is in military interventions, peacekeeping and European security and defense policy. She has published widely on these topics in journals such as International Security, Security Studies, International Studies Quarterly, International Peacekeeping and Conflict Management and Peace Science among others. Her book “Constructing Allied Cooperation: Diplomacy, Payments and Power in Multilateral Military Coalitions” is forthcoming (2019) with Cornell University Press. Prof. Henke holds a Ph.D. in Politics and Public Policy from Princeton University, a Double-MSc in Development Studies and International Political Economy from Sciences Po Paris and the London School of Economics, and a BA (summa cum laude) in Economics and Politics from Sciences Po Paris. Prior to joining Northwestern University, Prof. Henke was a Jennings Randolph Peace Scholar with the United States Institute of Peace (USIP). She also served as the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Public and International Affairs (JPIA) and worked with the U.S. House of Representatives’ Ways and Means Committee, the European Commission, the European Parliament, the German Foreign Office as well as NGOs in Mexico and Argentina.