BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 PRODID:-//hertie-school.org//NONSGML kigkonsult.se iCalcreator 2.29.21// CALSCALE:GREGORIAN METHOD:PUBLISH UID:574eb86e-de21-47c5-acbf-ab8eab25b81e X-WR-TIMEZONE:Europe/Berlin X-WR-CALDESC:Open governance: A new paradigm for understanding governance i n an information age X-WR-RELCALID:9f1f4159-6cd1-4879-b953-0b19a01bfb36 BEGIN:VEVENT UID:ea0f6167-3aa9-4ce3-9011-bae2a54b51ec DTSTAMP:20200806T103508Z DESCRIPTION:This theoretical viewpoint paper presents a new perspective on urban governance in an information age. Smart city governance is not only about technology but also about re-organizing collaboration between a vari ety of actors. The introduction of new tools for open collaboration in the public domain is rapidly changing the way collaborative action is organiz ed. These technologies reduce the transaction costs for massive collaborat ion dramatically and thus facilitate new forms of collaboration that we co uld call “open governance”: new innovative forms of collective action aime d at solving complex public policy issues\, contributing to public knowled ge\, or replacing traditional forms of public service provision. These inn ovative open and collaborative organizational forms in cities seem to poin t toward not only a wide variety of digitally connected actors but also to a fundamentally different and more invisible role of government in these arrangements. We argue that the recently emerging paradigm of New Public G overnance (NPG) (Osborne\, 2010) also fails to capture the dynamics of ope n governance since it does not acknowledge the emergent—pop-up—character o f the new collaborations\; neither does it present an understanding of mas sive individualized collaboration in cities. This paper aims to theoretica lly and empirically explore the core elements and the underlying socio-tec hnical developments of this new Open Governance (OG) paradigm and compare and contrast OG with existing governance paradigms.\nBased on illustrative real-life cases\, we will argue that we need a new paradigm that is bette r capable of explaining these emerging innovative forms of governing citie s. We will argue that this requires an understanding of governance as a pl atform that facilitates an urban ecosystem. By connecting new insights fro m studies on digital governance to the debate about governance paradigms\, this paper results in a set crucial empirical and normative questions abo ut governance of cities and also in guidelines for urban governance that b uilds upon the rich\, emerging interactions in cities that are facilitated by new technologies.\nAlbert Meijer is a professor of Public Management a t the Utrecht University School of Governance. He was trained as a chemist but\, already as a student\, he shifted his focus to the societal impacts of technology. He became fascinated by new technologies but even more by the way they transform our societies. He worked on these issues profession ally as a policy advisor and consultant and then decided to study them aca demically. His current research program on public innovation revolves arou nd the transformation of government in an information age and ranges from virtual organizations to electronic democracy. He has published extensivel y in top journals in the field of public administration and government inf ormation studies. He is the chair of the permanent studygroup on e-governm ent of the European Group for Public Administration and collaborates with researchers from various countries on issues of transparency\, e-governmen t and innovation.\nPrior registration is not required.\nDownload the paper here. DTSTART:20200401T110000Z DTEND:20200401T120000Z SUMMARY:Open governance: A new paradigm for understanding governance in an information age END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT UID:ea0f6167-3aa9-4ce3-9011-bae2a54b51ec DTSTAMP:20200806T103508Z DESCRIPTION:This theoretical viewpoint paper presents a new perspective on urban governance in an information age. Smart city governance is not only about technology but also about re-organizing collaboration between a vari ety of actors. The introduction of new tools for open collaboration in the public domain is rapidly changing the way collaborative action is organiz ed. These technologies reduce the transaction costs for massive collaborat ion dramatically and thus facilitate new forms of collaboration that we co uld call “open governance”: new innovative forms of collective action aime d at solving complex public policy issues\, contributing to public knowled ge\, or replacing traditional forms of public service provision. These inn ovative open and collaborative organizational forms in cities seem to poin t toward not only a wide variety of digitally connected actors but also to a fundamentally different and more invisible role of government in these arrangements. We argue that the recently emerging paradigm of New Public G overnance (NPG) (Osborne\, 2010) also fails to capture the dynamics of ope n governance since it does not acknowledge the emergent—pop-up—character o f the new collaborations\; neither does it present an understanding of mas sive individualized collaboration in cities. This paper aims to theoretica lly and empirically explore the core elements and the underlying socio-tec hnical developments of this new Open Governance (OG) paradigm and compare and contrast OG with existing governance paradigms.\nBased on illustrative real-life cases\, we will argue that we need a new paradigm that is bette r capable of explaining these emerging innovative forms of governing citie s. We will argue that this requires an understanding of governance as a pl atform that facilitates an urban ecosystem. By connecting new insights fro m studies on digital governance to the debate about governance paradigms\, this paper results in a set crucial empirical and normative questions abo ut governance of cities and also in guidelines for urban governance that b uilds upon the rich\, emerging interactions in cities that are facilitated by new technologies.\nAlbert Meijer is a professor of Public Management a t the Utrecht University School of Governance. He was trained as a chemist but\, already as a student\, he shifted his focus to the societal impacts of technology. He became fascinated by new technologies but even more by the way they transform our societies. He worked on these issues profession ally as a policy advisor and consultant and then decided to study them aca demically. His current research program on public innovation revolves arou nd the transformation of government in an information age and ranges from virtual organizations to electronic democracy. He has published extensivel y in top journals in the field of public administration and government inf ormation studies. He is the chair of the permanent studygroup on e-governm ent of the European Group for Public Administration and collaborates with researchers from various countries on issues of transparency\, e-governmen t and innovation.\nPrior registration is not required.\nDownload the paper here. DTSTART:20200401T110000Z DTEND:20200401T120000Z SUMMARY:Open governance: A new paradigm for understanding governance in an information age END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR