News
20.06.2022

Hertie School celebrates the Class of 2022

Congratulations to the Hertie School Class of 2022!
Some of our 2022 PhD graduates
Master of International Affairs - Class of 2022
Master of Public Policy - Class of 2022
Student speaker Eduardo Campbell Bethancourt, President Cornelia Woll and Commencement Speaker Katrin Suder

Over 250 graduates received master's and doctorate degrees.

Today the Hertie School conferred degrees on approximately 230 graduates of the Master of Public Policy and Master of International Affairs, and nearly 20 of the doctoral programmes in person at the Komische Oper. The graduates had to break new ground in many respects in order to complete their studies. 

"You are truly a unique cohort," said President Cornelia Woll at the ceremony, addressing the graduating class that endured especially challenging study conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. "I don’t exaggerate when I say that the resilience you have developed and shown over the last years is remarkable. Whatever comes next, you will come prepared with an extraordinary tool kit of strategies for coping and overcoming obstacles." Furthermore, the President also referred the graduates to the strong alumni network they can now rely on.


After two years of online ceremonies due to the pandemic, this year’s graduation ceremony took place again in person with about 750 guests in attendance. As in every year, the students chose a class speaker for the ceremony in advance. This year’s Class of 2022 speaker was MPP graduate Eduardo Campbell Bethancourt. In his speech, the 25-year-old Panamanian urged his peers to show humility towards their own merits. He emphasised that not only hard work, but also social and economic background as well as helping hands contribute to one’s own successes. 

Before the graduates received their certificates, this year's keynote speaker Dr. Katrin Suder, former State Secretary of the Federal Ministry of Defence, offered some reflections. In her speech, Suder called on the graduates to think about and value diversity as they embarked on their future career paths. "There is a trend towards less diversity, less global interaction, more national interests and more block-building," Suder said. In order to shape policy and change society, diversity was not only necessary, but also a source of hope, the expert on digitalisation explained.

For the new graduates of the Hertie School, career paths in the public sector, the private sector, academia and non-governmental organisations are now on the horizon. As part of the worldwide alumni network, they will work and thrive on various continents around the world.

All graduates’ profiles can be explored in our CV book.